ANE's August issue goes live Monday

The latest issue of the Automotive News Europe monthly magazine goes live on Monday, Aug. 7.

The new edition looks at how surging sales of SUVs have altered demand in nearly every vehicle segment in Europe and why that will continue.

Experts predict SUVs will account for more than a third of all European sales by 2020, up from about a quarter now. Our cover story looks at what effect that will have on the European market.

One of the biggest beneficiaries of Europe’s crossover craze has been Land Rover. The SUV specialist’s design boss, Gerry McGovern has helped lead the brand’s current success by creating so-called “white space” models such as the new Range Rover Velar to close key gaps in the automaker’s lineup. McGovern explains why Land Rover sees additional opportunities to expand the brand’s portfolio.

Renault is about to begin a new model cycle, one that will require design chief Laurens van den Acker to seamlessly integrate a growing variety of new sensors, screens and other technology that will be commonplace as vehicles become more autonomous, connected and electric. He says he’s ready for the challenge.

Europe’s first-half vehicle sales rose by 4.6 percent, defying predictions that the market would be nearly flat, and pushing monthly volumes to the highest level since June 2007, the pre-recession peak. There are signs, however, that the European rebound may be losing steam. We analyze the six-month sales and share insights on the second half.

Hyundai will double the number of SUVs it offers in Europe to four by 2019 and is expected to boost its crossover lineup even further by 2021, which is when it aims to pass Toyota and Nissan to become the region’s top-selling Asian brand. We look at the models that are key to Hyundai’s SUV-driven product offensive.

The relevance of auto shows as a showcase for brands and new model debuts is being questioned as automakers are increasingly holding their own events or choosing to attend smaller, more interactive showcases. The shift is underlined by the list of brands that will skip next month’s Frankfurt auto show. We assess the future of traditional auto shows.

Europe’s premium convertible segment is on the rise as new models from Mercedes-Benz, Mini and Porsche help to revive a sector that had been in steady decline for eight years. A big reason for the jump was the launch last June of the Mercedes C-class Cabriolet, which passed the BMW 2 series to become Europe’s best-selling premium convertible. We look at what to expect from the segment.

Our Latest Launches section include a review of the new Kia Picanto, which bucks the trend that cars must grow larger with every new generation. Kia increased the minicar’s cabin space while keeping it the same overall length and width.

The Citroen C3 Aircross epitomizes the disruption that SUVs are causing in Europe. Citroen discontinued the C3 Picasso minivan to make room for the C3 Aircross. The French automaker did this because it was losing ground to rivals that were faster to capitalize on the big shift to SUVs. The C3 Aircross is one of the models that will debut at next month’s Frankfurt auto show. We look at some key models that will be at the show.

Mazda hopes to boost demand for its CX-5, the brand’s top-selling model in Europe, with a new generation that has better driving dynamics, improved fuel economy as well as a quieter and more comfortable interior. We take a ride in Mazda’s most important model in Europe.

Webasto Chairman Holger Engelmann explains why he wants to turn the roofs specialist into a battery systems expert in time to capitalize on the forthcoming wave of electric cars from global automakers.

It was tough a quarter for Europe's automakers, parts suppliers and retailers. See which companies where hit hardest and which ones bucked the downward trend in our quarterly shareholder value report.

Volkswagen Group’s r&d mecca is in a secluded part of a small German town. The center resembles Q’s workshop from the James Bond movies. In our Final Word column we look at how VW’s brightest minds are addressing the industry’s most daunting challenges.

Europe’s powertrain plant footprint is undergoing big changes. Automakers are looking for ways to add production of components that support their move to electrified models. Our powertrain map provides a brand-by-brand breakdown of the components that are driving every model on the road. The updated, interactive guide featuring nearly 100 powertrain plants is available by clicking here.

Enjoy the issue!

Luca Ciferri, Associated Publisher and Editor

You can reach Luca Ciferri at lciferri@crain.com.


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