Opinion

At Detroit show, something for everyone

The consumer has spoken, and the auto industry has responded. Americans want SUVs and crossovers, and you'll see them at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit. Lots of them.

 

Moray Callum's retro ride

Moray Callum, Ford chief designer, is cruising around in a 1976 Bronco SUV as he oversees design of the nameplate's 2020 revival.

VW case starts new era of accountability

In a complicated industry using advanced technology that is governed by Byzantine rules and regulations, will this have a chilling effect on

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BLOG: Christiaan Hetzner
VW seeks 'flower-power' revival with greener Microbus

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Moray Callum's retro ride

Moray Callum, Ford chief designer, is cruising around in a 1976 Bronco SUV as he oversees design of the nameplate's 2020 revival.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR
A reliable recipe for dealership success

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COMMENTARY: Keith Crain
At Detroit show, something for everyone

The consumer has spoken, and the auto industry has responded. Americans want SUVs and crossovers, and you'll see them at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit. Lots of them.

EDITORIAL
VW case starts new era of accountability

In a complicated industry using advanced technology that is governed by Byzantine rules and regulations, will this have a chilling effect on executives as they seek to do their jobs? We hope so.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Families don't want downsized cars

Perhaps the shift to crossovers, SUVs and pickups has less to do with gas prices and more to do with cars becoming unsuitable to the American family's lifestyle, a reader writes.

BLOG: Douglas A. Bolduc
Conti powertrain guru makes peace with 'different world'

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A warm sendoff by dealers for a classy guy

Eric Peterson, who retired last year as the vice president of corporate diversity at General Motors, received a lifetime achievement award from the National Association of Minority Automobile Dealers on Sunday.

BLOG: Larry P. Vellequette
FCA shifts course, will make Jeep Grand Wagoneer body-on-frame

Fiat Chrysler has dramatically altered its product course and will now bring its new Jeep Grand Wagoneer back to life as a body-on-frame SUV, after nearly two years of claiming that it would be unibody like almost all other luxury nameplates.

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